BERT MAES

The Future of CNC Manufacturing Education – CNC Manufacturing, Education Reform & Change Management News.

Posts Tagged ‘apple’

Manufacturing: the unseen underground economy

Posted by Bert Maes on October 7, 2011


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In 1850, a decade before the Civil War, the United States’ economy was small — it wasn’t much bigger than Italy’s. Forty years later, it was the largest economy in the world. What happened in between was (…) the rise of steel and manufacturing — and the economy was never the same,” says W. Brian Arthur, an economist and technology thinker.

Since ages manufacturing is quietly, for many people unnoticeably, transforming the economy.

Manufacturing is silent, invisible and unseen.

Much like the root system for aspen trees, Arthur observes. “For every acre of aspen trees above the ground, there’s about ten miles of roots underneath, all interconnected with one another, “communicating” with each other.”

The observable physical world of aspen trees hides an unseen underground root system.

Just like trees, CNC machine tools are creating for us — slowly, quietly, and steadily — a different world.

Think about this: the success of Steve Jobs was based on CNC manufacturing machines, based on the invisible roots undergound: Apple puts CNC Machining Front and Center.

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The Manufacturing Sectors of the Future

Posted by Bert Maes on February 8, 2010


The U.S. manufacturing economy shifts away from heavy sectors, such as automobiles and basic chemicals, toward higher-tech products like super-fast computer chips.

The restructuring now under way offers insights into what kinds of goods the U.S. should produce, and in what volumes.

Semiconductor makers saw U.S. demand recover sharply as computer makers scrambled to catch up with a pickup in business investment toward the end of 2009.

Intel, which produces chips in Chandler, Ariz., Rio Rancho, N.M. and Hillsboro, Ore., boosted its capital investments to $1.08 billion in the fourth quarter, part of a two-year, $7 billion program to upgrade its U.S. plants.

Many companies still prefer to produce semiconductors in the U.S., particularly if their manufacturing is highly complex. Being close to the U.S.-based design centers of major chip users like computer maker Dell Inc. and consumer-electronics maker Apple Inc. also can be an advantage.

Texas Instruments Inc., the second-largest U.S. chipmaker will spend almost $1 billion this year to expand three factories and open a fourth to fill orders. The company is also hiring 250 workers to open a new chip-manufacturing plant in Richardson, Texas, that will eventually employ 1,000. (press-enterprise.com)

This is a kind of manufacturing that will make sense to do in the U.S. for a long time to come,” said Tim Peddecord, chief executive of privately held memory-module producer Avant Technology, which recently opened a new 50,000-square-foot plant in Pflugerville, Texas.

Manufacturing in the U.S., Mr. Peddecord said, allows it to turn around U.S. orders in 24 hours, an advantage in an industry where demand is volatile and clients try to keep inventories low. In addition, the reduced freight costs, compared with shipping goods from China, can offset the added cost of U.S. labor, since labor accounts for less than a hundredth of his average sales price.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

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8 good reasons to study CNC

Posted by Bert Maes on June 23, 2009


8 good reasons to study CNC

Check for world-class CNC schools in:
– North-America: www.HTECnetwork.org
– Europe: www.HTECnetwork.eu

What is CNC?

View this post: Apple’s new MacBook is manufactured on CNC machines, making them thinner, stronger and more robust.

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